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The Blog

A 2010 read on Lynette Yiadom – Boakye's Portraiture

When I was a Master's student at Christie's Education in 2010, I presented on Lynette Yiadom – Boakye, a fascinating artist who at the time was just emerging in the fine art world. My professors criticized my presentation - claiming I...

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The Personal Collection vs The Corporate Collection: A Study

In comparing and contrasting the experience of The Hort Family Collection with the works on view from the JPMorgan Chase Art Collection, one is prompted to examine notions of why people collect, the idiosyncratic nature of personal collecting habits, and...

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The strengths and weaknesses of applying psychoanalytic theory to art history

Written by Alix Greenberg Author, Vernon Hyde Minor, of Art History’s History, addresses the issue of applying psychoanalytic theory to art history with an exact precision. He asserts, “There are two remarkable but contentious attributes of psychoanalysis as a critical...

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Sarah Burns' Inventing the Modern Artist: Art & Culture in the Gilded Age

In Inventing the Modern Artist: Art & Culture in the Gilded Age, Sarah Burns utilizes images of specific works of art as visual evidence for her sociological claims discussed in chapter two: “The Artist in the Age of Surfaces.” She...

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The Formalist Criticism of Roger Fry and Clement Greenberg

In examining the formalist criticisms of Roger Fry and of Clement Greenberg, it is important to see one critic as a springboard for the other.  In the early twentieth century, Fry championed Post-Impressionism, an era whose work became a catalyst,...

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Addressing Feminist Issues in “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” and “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema”

In comparing the ways in which Linda Nochlin and Laura Mulvey address feminist issues in “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” and in “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” respectively, it is important to see one author as a...

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Can we reconcile the idea of the Avant-Garde and the market?

Jenson’s definition of the avant-garde departs from its strict association with the political left and replaces it with a category of marketability, such that the market and the avant-garde have a symbiotic relationship, that is codependent and interdependent. Picasso’s marketability...

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The relevancy of Jenson’s model of entrepreneurial or ideological art dealer

In Marketing Modernism in Fin-de-Siècle Europe, Robert Jenson writes, “Whereas the entrepreneurial dealer marketed artists through their contemporary reputations won through public exhibitions, the ideological dealer marketed his artists vis-à-vis a supposed historical position.” This model takes interesting form in...

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Art and Politics: have the issues changed since the 19th century?

WWI, more than any other conflict, charged the most potent images internationally. It was the first war to introduce technological warfare and artists experienced the war first hand. With the outbreak of WWI comes a rise of works on paper:...

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The major challenges that faced the establishment of Modernism, the major players, and the changing image of the artist

Jensen claims that Pop art is the greatest challenge to the avant-garde movement, a somewhat fuzzy term used to describe early Modernism. Pop art, in its direct link to commodification, recognizes that the “ideal market-audience the avant-garde has always sought”...

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Klimt's Mäda Primavesi

Like most portrait paintings by Klimt, this painting pits its subject against a highly adorned, ornamented background. The painterly application of pigment softens the disparate foreground and background, so that all boundaries are erased, creating a state of flux between...

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The differences between an ideological art dealer and an entrepreneurial dealer in Fin-de-Siecle Europe

In Marketing Modernism in Fin-de-Siecle Europe, Robert Jenson writes, “Whereas the Entrepreneurial dealer marketed artists through their contemporary reputations won through public exhibitions, the ideological dealer marketed his artists vis-à-vis a supposed historical position.” The ideological dealer’s practice was centered...

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The overriding concern for artists in the 19th century marketplace

In the 19th century, artists attempted to “solve the problem of finding a secure career in painting” (White and White) as the Academy was dying and genre painting became the trend. Consequently, a “much larger market for paintings was needed...

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The artists who best exemplified the model of an artist-entrepreneur

Degas: Degas was both an artist and an entrepreneur. In “An entrepreneur in spite of himself: Edgar Degas and the market,” the author writes, “Whether he liked it or not, Degas was both an artist and a businessman; the Romantic...

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What was the role of the artist in 19th century society?

  The role of artist in 19th century society was one of revolution, newfound individualism, freedom, and authenticity. In France, specifically, the role was one of rebellion, in which the emerging artists challenged the government’s standards of what was recognized...

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What is art?

In Why Are Artists Poor?: The Exceptional Economy of the Arts, Hans Abbing asserts “art is what people call art, acknowledging that some people have a bigger say in it than others have.” The author claims that two types of...

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White and White’s concept of the ‘dealer-critic system’

White and White’s concept of the ‘dealer-critic’ system can help us understand what happened with Impressionism. Primarily, this system sustained the Impressionists, in that the system provided the one-man show and independent group show to gain the public eye, through...

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A Close Look at Giacometti’s Market Trend

Alberto Giacometti’s (1901-1966) trend in the current art market has recently become part of the popular cultural consciousness due to the astronomical purchase of L’Homme qui Marche I, 1960 at Sotheby’s London Impressionist and Modern Art evening sale on February...

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Gustav Klimt and His Intellectual Patrons

Gustav Klimt, the Viennese Expressionist artist, was a central figure of the art and sociopolitical climate in Vienna, playing an extremely important role within the intellectual and cultural life at the end of the twentieth century. His most important contribution,...

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ArtSugar in Sierra: The national magazine of the Sierra Club (they LOVE Alyssa DePaola's photographs!)

We're excited to be in Sierra Magazine's Last-Minute Holiday Gift Experiences! Here's what they say about us:Don’t have a gift to put under the tree? Your loved ones won’t be disappointed once they hear you’ve commissioned custom artwork that benefits...

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Jean Dubuffet Le Métafisyx, 1950 from the Corps de Dames series

Le Métafisyx, by the French artist Jean Dubuffet (1901 – 1985), is a classic example of the artist’s oeuvre, typified by Existential figurative painting. Not only is the work executed in his signature Art Brut (raw art) style, but also...

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Georges Braque’s Candlestick and Playing Cards on a Table

Georges Braque’s Candlestick and Playing Cards on a Table, 1910, from The Mr. and Mrs. Klaus G. Perls Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a classic example of a “High” Analytic Cubist painting, a phase spanning from 1910-1912....

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Pablo Picasso’s Two Acrobats with a Dog, 1905 and Nadar’s Pierrot Surprised, 1854

Pablo Picasso’s Two Acrobats with a Dog, 1905 and Nadar’s Pierrot Surprised, 1854, provide an interesting comparison when examining notions of expressive content as a function of specific media. Although the two works were executed in different media, Two Acrobats...

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Bessie Potter Vonnoh's A Young Mother

A Young Mother, by American artist Bessie Potter Vonnoh (1872 - 1955), is an extraordinary visual representation of a symbiotic union between mother and child. The statuette’s intimate arrangement of forms, from the blanket that drapes the rocking chair and...

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Henry Lerolle's The Organ Rehearsal

The Organ Rehearsal, 1885, painted by French artist Henry Lerolle (1848-1929), is a large-scale work that hangs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art today. The work hangs solo on the gallery wall, immersing spectators in an overwhelming sense of calm...

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Case Study 18 “Seeing Through Paintings”

Case Study 18 attempts to “expose the gap between the modernist effect of spontaneity and the slow and deliberate paint application that produced it.” Utilizing Jackson Pollock’s Blue Poles as an example of a work in question, this study proves...

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Definition of connoisseurship, its components and relation to the study of art history

According to Ebitz and Opperman, contemporary connoisseurship, in practice and in study, draws many parallels to scientific research. Today, connoisseurs do not rely solely on “a good eye,” they also rely on new technological methods, such as x-rays and infrared...

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Understanding the relationship and correlation between style in modern art and value

In Joseph Koerner’s “Value,” he asserts taste demonstrates that source value lay not in the judged object but in the judging subject, we value the object not as it is, but as it is for us. In “Style,” Meyer Shapiro...

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Join ArtSugar, Stephanie Gottlieb & Riley Versa this Sunday 12.17 in NYC 

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ArtSugar in Style Me Pretty: Socially Minded Gift Guide!

Flattered! ArtSugar is featured in this article with a ton of very cool brands - here's a link to the entire article: Style Me Pretty And here's what they say about us... "Art Sugar: Fifty percent of the proceeds from...

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Join us Tonight (12.7) in NYC!

December 7, 2017, 5-8pm, The Hanley 165 east 66th street (in the lounge)

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Phenomenology

In “Notes on Sculpture II” and “The Double Negative: A New Syntax for Sculpture,” authors Robert Morris and Rosalind E. Krauss, respectively, successfully appropriate Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s theories on perception as a backbone for their own arguments. To fully understand how...

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Picasso’s Demoiselles D’Avignon

In their articles, “The Demoiselles d’Avignon” and “The Demoiselles D’Avignon and Dionysian Destruction,” John Golding and Ron Johnson, respectively, employ disparate methodologies in examining Picasso’s groundbreaking painting. Although Golding and Johnson approach the painting differently, it is important to see...

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Duchamp’s Large Glass

In Marcel Duchamp: “The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even” and “Duchamp and the Classical Perspectivists,” authors John Golding and Jean Clair, respectively, employ disparate methodologies in examining Marcel Duchamp’s groundbreaking work. Although Golding and Clair approach the work...

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ArtSugar x Stephanie Gottlieb: Shine Bright Like A Diamond

ArtSugar has had the immense opportunity to work with an incredible artist based in Kiev - Anna Panchenko's prints are sold on artsugar.co - they are provocative, edgy, fun and gorgeous - and mostly focused on her own mouth holding an object - from food,...

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ArtSugar x Flawless Foundation: A Thoughtful Collaboration

My friend Barbara Borozan, who I met at Cornell (both of us graduated in 2009), recently introduced me to Flawless Foundation, which she sits on the board of. As an artist, I was particularly and immediately drawn to its mission: to...

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Oswald de Andrade

Oswald de Andrade (1880-1954), also known as José Oswald de Andrade Souza, was a Brazillian poet and polemicist from São Paulo, Brazil. Andrade is most famous for his manifestos of Brazilian nationalism, which are the Pau Brasil Manifesto and the...

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Joseph Manca's Moral Stance in Italian Renaissance Art: Image, Text, and Meaning

In Moral Stance in Italian Renaissance Art: Image, Text, and Meaning, Joseph Manca argues that artists of the Renaissance period, used weight and firm, stable posture to express a sense of integrity and moral strength in their subject. The artists...

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Alicia Framis and Postcolonialism

According to Liz Wells’ Photography: A Critical Introduction, “postcolonial commentators draw attention to the vast diasporic movement of peoples around the globe; examine the sets of appropriations and relations of hybridity between colonizer and colonized, and problematise questions of identity...

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On Joan Mitchell

The Museum of Modern Art displays Joan Mitchell’s work in a large, open, square gallery area: Four large-scale paintings hang on two white walls and are enveloped by very high ceilings. The room has a few large openings, two are...

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Frida Kahlo and Self Image by Alix Greenberg

In her article, “Women Artists: Self Image,” Ellen Lubell says that because of today’s changing definitions of art and art forms, “which have expanded the media and formats in which self-images have been executed, self-images are as diverse as the...

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Buy Art, Do Good - ArtSugar in Oregon Jewish Life

Article by Deborah Moon, Oregon Jewish Life Alix Greenberg has been an artist and an active member of her synagogue for as long as she can remember. When someone offered to pay for her artwork for the first time a...

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A Close Look at Giacometti’s Market Trend

Alberto Giacometti’s (1901-1966) trend in the current art market has recently become part of the popular cultural consciousness due to the astronomical purchase of L’Homme qui Marche I, 1960 at Sotheby’s London Impressionist and Modern Art evening sale on February...

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The Important Artistic Institutions in the United States in the 19th Century by Alix Greenberg

Before discussion of the important artistic institutions in the US in the 19th century, I think it is important to note America’s initial awareness and fascination with the European art world. 1867 was a key year in terms of Americans...

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On Vito Acconci's Seedbed by Alix Greenberg

Vito Acconci’s Seedbed, performed for three weeks in January 1972 at the Sonnabend Gallery New York, is a legendary exhibition and, according to Kate Linker’s monograph Vito Acconci, “may be the most famous artwork of the early 1970s, a piece...

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The main issues to keep in mind when evaluating sculpture by Alix Greenberg

When evaluating sculpture, particularly bronzes, you must keep in mind that you may be in the presence of a fake. To determine authenticity, see that each cast have on it information confirming date, foundry, size of edition, actual date of...

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Why Paris be called the center of the art world in the 19th Century by Alix Greenberg

Paris should be called the center of the art world in the 19th century. Epitomizing this notion is the Palais de l’Industrie, Universal Exposition, Paris of 1855. Post 1851, these expositions were no longer national, and therefore, a feeding frenzy...

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Judith Bernstein and the Rhetoric of Power by Alix Greenberg

Whenever women in the arts seek to move forward within the art world establishment, conservative forces of every variety gather to hold them back. Every advance is gained only through great expenditure of energy and unremitting endurance.[1] – Cindy Nemser, 1974...

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Tracing Interpretations of Francis Bacon’s Papal Portraits Over Time by Alix Greenberg

At the end of World War II, Francis Bacon, the British painter, painted figures that were seemingly transformed by the imagery of the unconscious. Bacon’s direct revelation of the unconscious evokes the chaotic forces that civilization has repressed in humanity...

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Why I Decided to Scale by Alix Greenberg, CEO & Founder ArtSugar

This June I lost my grandma Sylvia to pancreatic cancer - she was a second mom to me. She was such a positive force in my life, I wanted to turn my anger and sadness into something worthwhile - propelling me to take a risk - leave...

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